How to get A1 for Chemistry for the O-levels?

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Be it taking Pure Chemistry or Combined Science that comprises of Chemistry, the tips to follow through to get A1 for them are similar.

Of course, for Combined Science, you will need to put in an equal amount of effort for the other half of the combination to secure the A1 for your final grade at the O-levels.

Here are some tips for you to follow through to guide you towards getting A1 for Chemistry at the O-levels:


1. Know the format and syllabus
The format of the O-level Pure Chemistry Paper is as follows:

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As for the syllabus, these are the topics tested:

  • Experimental Chemistry
  • Atomic Structure and Stoichiometry: The Particulate Nature of Matter, Formulae, Stoichiometry and the Mole Concept
  • Chemistry of Reactions: Electrolysis, Energy from Chemicals, Chemical Reactions, Acids, Bases and Salts
  • Periodicity: The Periodic Table, Metals
  • Atmosphere: Air
  • Organic Chemistry

For more details on the areas tested for each topic, do refer to the official syllabus.


As for the Combined Science for Chemistry
The format of the paper is as follows:
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The topics tested are as follow:

  • Experimental Chemistry
  • Atomic Structure and Stoichiometry: The Particulate Nature of Matter, Formulae, Stoichiometry and the Mole Concept
  • Chemistry of Reactions: Energy Changes, Chemical Reactions, Acids, Bases and Salts
  • Periodicity: The Periodic Table, Metals
  • Atmosphere: Air
  • Organic Chemistry

For more details on the areas tested for each topic, do refer to the official syllabus.

It may appear that the content covered is largely similar here, but it isn’t as so. Do refer to the official syllabus for the science that you are taking.


2. Ensure that you have a good grasp of the topics tested
As the content covered for either of the science is rather heavy and spread over a course of two years to study, do make a checklist of the topics and sub-topics that you need to cover. This checklist can come to be a helpful guide for you to plan your study schedule leading up to the O-levels.

It will also give you a clearer end in mind.

Also, depending on the time you are reading this post, find out the amount of time you have left up to the paper and plan realistically.

You can use these free printables available online to help plan your studying schedule for Chemistry at the O-levels.

Having a good grasp of the topics tested is essential as the nature of the subject may bring about.


3. Make your notes
For subjects like the sciences, it will always be useful to make some notes as it serves as a checkpoint to revisit the concepts taught in school. Putting the content learned into your own format will also be helpful for you to review everything more easily.

Thus, as you revise the content with the study schedule you have came up with earlier, do make some notes alongside to make the most out of your revision time.


4. Practice
To do well, students cannot escape attempting practices. Attempting practice papers is the best way to concretize all the effort put in prior to the examinations as a point of assessment of your level of understanding. It gives you the exposure to the varied types of possible questions that may be tested.


5. Get help if needed
Don’t ever hesitate to seek help or put any of the questions in your head to “another day”. These may unknowingly build up to a significant amount of queries up to the O-levels so try not to fall into that pithole. Be it staying back for consultations after classes, studying with your peers or finding a Chemistry tutor, be sure to start early in getting the help you need.


6. Not forgetting, rest!
It may be a really stressful period for you and you may want to maximize all the time you have up till the O-levels. But do not forget to take a break. Trying to cramp a lot of content within a short period or consecutive period of time isn’t going to be productive.

Geraldine Lee
Geraldine lives out of bubbles and dreams. When she’s not writing, she reads about kids and parenting matters. Her works have been featured on Singapore’s Child, theAsianParent and now, even yodaa.